Missed in-class credit, IB English II

This page tells you what to do if you missed credit earned for in-class work. This is usually small and large group work. (Homework assignments are on the assignment board.) 

Assignment #8: 4-24 or 26-18--Note: Even students who took this quiz can use the instructions here to make up points. (Students took a quiz over 12 quotations from Slaughterhouse Five.) If you were absent,  you can earn up to full credit. 1. Take the quote sheet or get one from Ms. Nott. 2. Fill in the correct answers. Then, on the back, write an IB style question based on one of the quotations instead of a silly factual question like I wrote! Sample: 

Quotation #5: Why is it ironic that Campbell finds Billy boring? 

Assignment #7: 4-23 OR 25-18---Today, students took detailed notes on Test 1, Practice #4. They were to read both, pick the preferred work and take detailed notes on the text. As a class, we brainstormed thesis and topic sentence ideas. To make up these points, pick either the prose or the poetry on practice #4, take detailed notes, write a thesis and write at least 4 topic sentence ideas. (Write the thesis out word for word; you can just write topics by key words to represent the topic sentences.) 

Assignment #6: 4-17-18---Today, we discussed Slaughterhouse Five in both small and large group. The focus was on a close reading of a passage.To make up these points, pick one of your best, most thought-provoking passages, and write a one-page essay, typed, exploring significance of the passage. (If you know what I mean, try the "burger model" for this paper; that is what we did in class.)

(ITEMS BELOW ARE FROM THIRD QUARTER)

Assignment #18: 3-16-18---On this day, students earned credit for their comments, questions and text references in large group discussion. To make up these points, pick any passage on any page and incorporate it into a one-paragraph essay. In the essay, comment on the effect of the passage. Use literary terms where appropriate. 

Assignment #8: 2-13 and/or 2-21-18---On these two days, students earned credit for participating in a large group discussion about A Room With a View by E.M. Forster. If the student preferred not to speak or was absent, they could complete the following make up assignment to earn the points: Pick a passage that either reveals theme or is an aphorism. Paraphrase the passage, tell how it applies to the novel, and tell how it does or does not apply to your life. This can be neatly hand-written or typed. 

Assignment #6: 2-16-18---Today the students worked in partners to discuss the novel, A Room With a View. To make up these points, ask Ms. Nott for the instruction sheet. 

Assignment #4: 2-8-18---Today in class we did a focused small group workshop with the novel Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton. To make up these points, please look at the instructions below. Add at least 2 items to your purple sheet. In addition to this, write a typed, one-paragraph essay in response to prompt #3.

Workshop on Ethan Frome

1. Clarify plot questions in small group. Call Ms. Nott over with questions. Discuss

2. Write at least ONE new thing on your purple sheet. Share it with the group.

3. Pick one concept from Techniques, Devices and Concepts on yellow sheet #4; find an example on a specific page; explain effect to group.

4. Find a "Great line." Share it with your group and explain its importance.

5. Look at the back of Sheet 4. What is something on this list that may be significant in this novel?

6. AS A GROUP, find at least one poetic device.3 


(ITEMS BELOW ARE FROM SECOND QUARTER)

Assignment #19: 12-22-17---Today in class, students did their final (required for credit) practice oral commentary.To make up these points, you must show comprehension of both the Kunitz poem (either "Quinnapoxet" or "The Gladiators") and either Walker or Shakespeare. To meet this goal, please type a one-paragraph essay exploring ONE concept you notice in your notes on the Kunitz poem. To demonstrate you knowledge of either Shakespeare or Walker, answer ONE of the questions on the practice question sheet in a one-paragraph essay. So, sorry, but the make up needs to be two TYPED paragraphs. Thanks. Please get this to me soon, OK? 

OR: record yourself doing a practice Oral Commentary and Discussion and forward the recording to me. If you can't find someone to ask you questions for the Discussion portion, ask yourself questions! 

Either choice is due the Monday after break, 1/8.

Assignment #17: 12-15-17--Today in class, students did their best practice oral commentary and discussion to date. At least, that was our goal and it appears most students found this to be true. To make up these points, you must show comprehension of both the Kunitz poem (either "Passing Through" or "Snakes of September") and either Walker or Shakespeare. To meet this goal, please type a one-paragraph essay exploring ONE concept you notice in your notes on the Kunitz poem. To demonstrate you knowledge of either Kunitz or Walker, answer ONE of the questions on the practice quesiton sheet in a one-paragraph essay. So, sorry, but the make up needs to be two TYPED paragraphs. Thanks. Please get this to me soon, OK? 

Assignment #15 (Formerly marked as X): 12-11-17--Today in class, students used the Practice Questions and the homework due today to parctice answering questions in an organized fashion with specific details. To make up these points, you have several choices. 1. Ask to make them up in class and I'll ask you two questions in large group; 2. Come in after school and I'll ask you two questions; 3. Type an essay answering one of the questions. 

Assignment #11: 12-1-17--Today in class, students earned credit for completing a full individual oral commentary on either "The Image-Maker" or "The Flight of Apollo" by Stanley Kunitz. These points can be made up by practicing with a friend and telling Ms. Nott or coming in to practice with Ms. Nott. If neither of these work, a one-page, typed analysis of one aspect of the poem is also acceptable. 

Assignment #2: 11-2-17--Today in class, students earned credit for completing a full individual oral commentary on either "The Round" or "Halley's Comet" by Stanley Kunitz. These points can be made up by practicing with a friend and telling Ms. Nott or coming in to practice with Ms. Nott. If neither of these work, a one-page, typed analysis of one aspect of the poem is also acceptable. 

(ITEMS BELOW ARE FROM FIRST QUARTER)

Assignment #19: 10-30-17---Today in class, students earned credit for completing a full individual oral commentary on the first four poems in the Stanley Kunitz Packet #1. To make up these points, please write a one-page essay on one of the poems.

Assignment #17: 10-26-17---Today in class, students earned credit for completing a full individual oral commentary on the Stanley Kunitz poem, "Indian Summer at Land's End." To make up these points, you have choices: practice with a partner and tell me about it in writing; write a one-page essay on the poem, or make an appointment with Ms. Nott to make up the credit by practicing out loud with her. 

Assignment #16: 10-24-17---Today in class, students earned credit for completing a full individual oral commentary on their selected Summer Reading poem. To make up these points, you have choices: practice with a partner and tell me about it in writing; write a one-page essay on the poem, or make an appointment with Ms. Nott to make up the credit by practicing out loud with her.